The usual suspects placed bets on this year’s most competitive races

Forex stock trading

no deposit bonus forex.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Dave-Bran-and-Abigail-Spanberger.png” alt=”In Virginia’s 7th Congressional District, Republican Dave Brat was unseated by Democrat Abigail Spanberger” width=”897″ height=”396″ srcset=”https://www.no deposit bonus forex.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Dave-Bran-and-Abigail-Spanberger.png 897w, https://www.no deposit bonus forex.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Dave-Bran-and-Abigail-Spanberger-300×132.png 300w, https://www.no deposit bonus forex.org/news/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Dave-Bran-and-Abigail-Spanberger-768×339.png 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 897px) 100vw, 897px”>

In Virginia’s 7th District, Republican Dave Brat was unseated by Democrat Abigail Spanberger
(photo of Brat via Flickr/Gage Skidmore, photo of Spanberger via Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As of Nov. 28, twenty-eight Republican House incumbents were defeated by Democratic challengers in the 2018 election. The Republicans and Democrats drew from distinct sources of money.

Top Industries for Defeated Republican Incumbents
Industry Candidate Count Total Rank
Leadership PACs 28 $6,619,635 1
Retired 28 $6,250,447 2
Securities & Investment 28 $4,882,776 3
Real Estate 28 $4,788,077 4
Insurance 28 $3,580,164 5
Lawyers/Law Firms 28 $2,508,605 6
Republican/Conservative 28 $2,448,509 7
Health Professionals 28 $2,390,592 8
Oil & Gas 28 $2,366,573 9
Pharmaceuticals/Health Products 28 $1,798,381 10
Commercial Banks 27 $1,759,507 11
Lobbyists 28 $1,673,990 12
Misc Finance 27 $1,509,569 13
Automotive 28 $1,439,814 14
Candidate Committees 28 $1,375,075 15
Misc Manufacturing & Distributing 27 $1,362,064 16
Accountants 28 $1,221,112 17
Retail Sales 28 $1,177,678 18
Crop Production & Basic Processing 28 $1,150,777 19
Air Transport 28 $1,028,713 20


Republicans in these races depended heavily on fellow politicians —
Leadership PACs were their #1 industry and Candidate Committees also made the top 20. These sources gave a combined average of over $285,000 to the endangered incumbents. Sometimes you don’t get by with a little help from your friends.

Beyond that, a wide range of industries supported these incumbents, including Lobbyists, Oil & Gas, Pharmaceuticals and a wide range of FIRE industries.

We see a different set of industries on the Democratic side.

Top Industries for Winning Democratic Challengers
Industry Candidate Count Total Rank
Democratic/Liberal 28 $12,854,765 1
Lawyers/Law Firms 28 $8,964,132 2
Securities & Investment 28 $8,849,125 3
Retired 28 $8,277,304 4
Education 28 $5,064,321 5
Women’s Issues 23 $3,637,888 6
Real Estate 28 $3,533,558 7
Business Services 28 $2,701,179 8
Misc Finance 28 $2,320,344 9
Leadership PACs 27 $2,266,986 10
TV/Movies/Music 28 $2,250,588 11
Printing & Publishing 28 $1,913,635 12
Health Professionals 28 $1,884,676 13
Non-Profit Institutions 28 $1,798,326 14
Electronics Mfg & Equip 28 $1,643,145 15
Human Rights 28 $1,478,880 16
Internet 28 $1,394,895 17
Misc Business 28 $1,274,760 18
Civil Servants/Public Officials 28 $1,161,182 19
Candidate Committees 27 $767,023 20


The Democratic challengers relied heavily on ideological donors —
Democratic/Liberal groups averaged nearly $460,000 each to these candidates. Lawyers came in second.

On the other hand, they depended less on fellow politicians than their Republican opponents did. Multiple ideological industries made the Democratic list.

In addition, media industries such as TV/Movies/Music and Printing & Publishing were major sources of contributions. Education was also a major source of money. Like their Republican opponents, the Democrats also raised substantial sums from FIRE industries. No Labor industries made it into the top 20.

Top Donors for Defeated Republican Incumbents
Donor Candidate Count Total Rank
Votesane PAC 12 $303,933 1
Ernst & Young 26 $273,400 2
AT&T Inc 28 $264,316 3
Majority Cmte PAC 26 $260,000 4
Making America Prosperous 28 $260,000 4
American Bankers Assn 27 $255,750 6
New York Life Insurance 26 $254,475 7
Comcast Corp 26 $251,200 8
Prosperity Action 25 $250,000 9
Koch Industries 27 $247,050 10
Northrop Grumman 26 $236,481 11
Honeywell International 25 $223,515 12
Eye of the Tiger PAC 28 $220,500 13
National Beer Wholesalers Assn 27 $219,500 14
Deloitte LLP 27 $216,880 15
Home Depot 27 $216,500 16
More Conservatives PAC 26 $215,000 17
Goldman Sachs 24 $212,650 18
PricewaterhouseCoopers 26 $211,300 19
Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America 26 $204,500 20


Surprisingly, the biggest donor for the embattled Republican incumbents was
VoteSane PAC. VoteSane acts primarily as a conduit for campaign contributions and is bipartisan. Their two biggest recipients in 2018 were Joe Donnelly and Claire McCaskill, both Democratic Senators defeated in their bids for re-election. So they’ve backed losing incumbents for both sides.

Leadership PACs were well represented among the top donors. Kevin McCarthy’s Majority Committee PAC was fourth overall. Others included Kevin Brady’s Making America Prosperous PAC, Paul Ryan’s Propserity Action, Steve Scalise’s Eye of the Tiger PAC and Patrick McHenry’s More Conservatives PAC. A variety of business donors made up the rest of the list, including Koch Industries.

Top Donors for Winning Democratic Challengers
Donor Candidate Count Total Rank
Alphabet Inc 28 $776,933 1
University of California 28 $610,952 2
Swing Left 20 $523,092 3
EMILY’s List 20 $477,231 4
Stanford University 28 $338,359 5
Harvard University 28 $285,232 6
Bain Capital 24 $278,320 7
Akin, Gump et al 23 $276,915 8
AmeriPAC: The Fund for a Greater America 25 $246,800 9
Bessemer Venture Partners 17 $231,150 10
End Citizens United 26 $217,859 11
DE Shaw & Co 23 $211,165 12
J Street 13 $189,845 13
Insight Venture Partners 18 $188,421 14
Tao Capital Management 16 $180,400 15
AT&T Inc 27 $172,126 16
PAC to the Future 19 $160,000 17
Democracy Engine 10 $154,485 18
New Democrat Coalition 24 $145,600 19
American Federation of State/Cnty/Munic Employees 21 $145,490 20


Unsurprisingly, the top donor list for the Democrats is very different from the Republicans.

Alphabet Inc, the parent company of Google, tops an eclectic list of contributors. They managed to contribute to every winning Democratic challenger. The rest of the list includes multiple universities as well as multiple ideological donors and Wall Street firms. Two leadership PACs made the list — Steny Hoyer’s AmeriPAC and Nancy Pelosi’s PAC to the Future. Only one labor PAC — AFSCME — made the list.

Overall, the different sources of money reflect both partisanship and incumbency. The Republicans relied heavily on business donors, lobbyists and fellow politicians — the kind of donors you would expect to support both Republicans and incumbents. The Democrats in contrast relied heavily on ideological sources as would be expected for challengers, and education and media as would be expected for Democrats. Labor unions played a relatively minor role in direct contributions to these Democrats.

The post The usual suspects placed bets on this year’s most competitive races appeared first on no deposit bonus forex News.


copy